A man's linen cap, said to have been worn by Charles I

 
A man's linen cap, said to have been worn by Charles I
4 0 c m
 
30cm
actual image size: 22cm x 29cm

Full image caption

A man's linen cap, said to have been worn by Charles I, although the cut-work or needle-lace trim was going out of fashion by the 1620s. Cap linings like this were worn underneath the informal round embroidered nightcaps used at home, and the lace turned up to form a decorative edge. Linen was easily washed and helped to keep the embroidered pieces clean by acting as a lining. The splits along the lower edge near the lace are consistent with having being folded back regularly.

The history associated with the cap says that Charles I wore it at the wedding of George Kirke and Mary Townshend in Oxford on 26 February 1646. George Kirke served Charles I as a Groom to the Royal Bedchamber, and had done so before the king's accession in 1625.

© Museum of London

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