Industry and Idleness: plate 1: 1747

Baldwin & Cradock

Industry and Idleness: plate 1: 1747
3 0 c m
40cm
actual image size: 29cm x 22cm

Full image caption

Industry and Idleness: plate 1. Weaver's workshop with two looms and two reels for winding spun yarn. The Idle 'Prentice is asleep while Golding operates his loom. From 'The Works of William Hogarth 'from the original plates restored by James Heath published in 1822.
This Hogarth print shows what an 18th century weaving workshop looked like. From the 1670s, the Huguenots were a vital part of the London silk industry. Most of them were originally refugees from northern France. They had been merchants, master weavers or journeymen in various textile industries. In England, the best weavers were accepted as foreign masters by the Weavers' Company, whereas they had been barred from this professional qualification in France. The Huguenot master weavers of Spitalfields lived in fine houses employing both Huguenot and English workers. These employees wove from their own homes in the poorer streets.
This Hogarth print shows what an 18th century weaving workshop looked like. From the 1670s, the Huguenots were a vital part of the London silk industry. Most of them were originally refugees from northern France. They had been merchants, master weavers or journeymen in various textile industries. In England, the best weavers were accepted as foreign masters by the Weavers' Company, whereas they had been barred from this professional qualification in France. The Huguenot master weavers of Spitalfields lived in fine houses employing both Huguenot and English workers. These employees wove from their own homes in the poorer streets.
This Hogarth print shows what an 18th century weaving workshop looked like. From the 1670s, the Huguenots were a vital part of the London silk industry. Most of them were originally refugees from northern France. They had been merchants, master weavers or journeymen in various textile industries. In England, the best weavers were accepted as foreign masters by the Weavers' Company, whereas they had been barred from this professional qualification in France. The Huguenot master weavers of Spitalfields lived in fine houses employing both Huguenot and English workers. These employees wove from their own homes in the poorer streets.
This Hogarth print shows what an 18th century weaving workshop looked like. From the 1670s, the Huguenots were a vital part of the London silk industry. Most of them were originally refugees from northern France. They had been merchants, master weavers or journeymen in various textile industries. In England, the best weavers were accepted as foreign masters by the Weavers' Company, whereas they had been barred from this professional qualification in France. The Huguenot master weavers of Spitalfields lived in fine houses employing both Huguenot and English workers. These employees wove from their own homes in the poorer streets.

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