The Upper Condemned Cell at Newgate Prison on the Morning of the Execution of Henry Fauntleroy: 19th century
3 0 c m
40cm
actual image size: 27cm x 22cm

The Upper Condemned Cell at Newgate Prison on the Morning of the Execution of Henry Fauntleroy: 19th century

W. Thomson

© Museum of London

Full image caption

The Upper Condemned Cell at Newgate Prison on the Morning of the Execution of Henry Fauntleroy. Oil on canvas. This scene shows Henry Fauntleroy who was condemned to death for forgery. He is depicted in the upper condemned cell at Newgate Prison, preparing to leave for his execution. The Executioner is tying his hands, while another condemned prisoner is having shackles removed prior to execution and a 3rd prisoner, with his hands already tied, is seated on the right. Henry Fauntleroy, a partner in the bank Marsh, Sibbald and Co., was convicted of forgery in 1824 and condemned to death. He pleaded that his actions had been forced upon him by his bank's unstable finances and that all the sums he had raised had been used solely to improve its credit. His case aroused public sympathy. A crowd of over 100,000 witnessed his execution on the morning of 20 November 1824.
 

Artist/Photographer/Maker

 

Date

1828 AD - 1828 AD
 

Image Number

001652
 

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