Beggars leaving town for their workhouses: 19th century
4 0 c m
 
30cm
actual image size: 21cm x 32cm

Beggars leaving town for their workhouses: 19th century

John Thomas Smith

© Museum of London

Full image caption

Beggars leaving town for their workhouses. These beggars may have left their workhouse in the morning and returned there to sleep at night, though this behaviour was discouraged. Since they were introduced in the 17th century, workhouses were intended to be grim places. This was to deter all but the desperately needy. The workhouse was run by the local parish and funded by the ratepayers. Inmates included the disabled, the chronically ill, the old, the unemployed, single mothers and orphans. People joining the workhouse wore a uniform and followed a strict schedule. They spent most of the day doing housework, gardening or harder tasks such as stonebreaking. This etching is from 'Vagabondiana or, anecdotes of mendicant wanderers through the streets of London; with portraits of the most remarkable.' by John Thomas Smith.
 

Artist/Photographer/Maker

 

Date

1816 AD - 1817 AD
 

Image Number

004199
 

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